Calendar

$20under40

The Minnesota Orchestra is pleased to offer $20 tickets for guests under the age of 40! This special offer is available for select concerts throughout the season, and more concerts are added monthly. See below for a list of eligible events.

20under40

Join the #MNOrch Monday email list to receive the following:

  • Notification when additional concerts become eligible for the $20under40 discount
  • Invitations to Pint of Music, FREE chamber music events at your favorite local breweries
  • Other exclusive ticket offers and special events at Orchestra Hall

How to get your tickets online:

Simply choose a concert listed below and select “$20under40” for the ticket type when choosing your seats (top-priced seating sections not eligible). Tickets will be held at the Box Office and require one valid ID showing proof of age (must be 40 years or younger) per two tickets purchased. Order online or by phone for Will Call pickup only. Limit one pair of $20 tickets per eligible performance.

Eligible Concerts

About This Concert

Strings take center stage as noted cellist and conductor Paul Watkins joins us for a luminous cello concerto and Beethoven’s Fourth Symphony. These bite-sized concerts are shorter and begin at 6pm. Join us for a pre-concert happy hour, local craft brews and a chance to mingle with musicians onstage after the performance.

Program

C.P.E. BACH
Cello Concerto in A major / 20 min

BEETHOVEN
Symphony No. 4 / 32 min

Read more

Program Notes PDF

Artists

Fun Facts

  • The Fourth Symphony represents a lighter, more relaxed version of Beethoven’s music, as it falls in between his bold Third (Eroica) and Fifth Symphonies. Robert Schumann described the Fourth as “a slender Greek maiden between two Nordic giants.”
  • Carl Philipp Emanuel Bach was Johann’s son and held a 30-year job as harpsichord accompanist to King Frederick the Great.

Accessibility at Orchestra Hall

Assisted listening devices available Large print program available Wheelchair seating availableService dogs welcomePlease refrain from using strong perfumes and colognes

Complete event details

About This Concert

Beethoven "heard" music with his mind after his ears gave out. Messiaen "saw" sounds in literal vibrant color. But the music of a listener plays an equal role in shaping the music we hear and the way we respond to it. In this concert, we explore the cutting edge of how the rhythms and melodies we love engage our brains and prod us to seek out more. 

Program

BEETHOVEN
Adagio molto e cantabile, from Symphony No. 9 / 15 min

MOZART
Allegro, from Symphony No. 39 / 6 min

SCHOENBERG
Excerpt from Accompaniment to a Cinematic Scene / 5 min

MESSIAEN
Serene hallelujahs of a soul that longs for heaven, from L’Ascension, Four Meditations for Orchestra / 6 min

BRUCKNER
Scherzo: Moving – Trio: Comfortable, from Symphony No. 4, Romantic / 9 min

—INTERMISSION 20 MINUTES—

SCHUMANN
Allegro molto vivace, from Symphony No. 2 / 8 min

REVUELTAS
Sensemaya / 7 min

LEVIN
Blur / 6 min

SIBELIUS
Finale: Allegro moderato, from Symphony No. 2 / 15 min

Artists

Fun Facts

  • Minnesota Orchestra Principal Conductor Sarah Hicks and violist Sam Bergman host this fascinating exploration of the way our minds engage with music on a neuropsychological level.
  • The mythologizing of composers and their mental health has a long history, but what of our own minds as we take in the work they created? What happens to our brains as we listen to music we love, or music we hate?
  • This program offers an intimate perspective on featured composers and themes through lively discussion and wide-ranging musical selections.
  • Join us for a pre-concert happy hour, local craft brews and a chance to mingle with musicians onstage after the performance.

Accessibility at Orchestra Hall

Assisted listening devices available Large print program available Wheelchair seating availableService dogs welcomePlease refrain from using strong perfumes and colognes

Complete event details

About This Concert

In his Concerto for Orchestra, Bartók upends the concerto form by treating each section of instruments in a soloistic and virtuosic manner. The mood progresses from stern to spooky to life-affirming, with two witty scherzos scattered into the mix. Acclaimed American conductor Karina Canellakis leads the Orchestra in a vivacious performance that includes Bartók’s Concerto for Orchestra, Ravel’s jazz-infused Piano Concerto and Lineage by Zosha Di Castri.

Program

DI CASTRI
Lineage / 11 min

RAVEL
Piano Concerto in G major / 21 min

INTERMISSION / 20 min

BARTÓK
Concerto for Orchestra / 38 min

Artists

  • Minnesota Orchestra
  • Karina Canellakis, conductor
  • Francesco Piemontesi, piano

Fun Facts

  • Winner of the 2016 Georg Solti Conducting Award, Canellakis is the first female chief conductor of the Dutch Radio Philharmonic Orchestra.
  • Zosha Di Castri is a Canadian composer-pianist whose work includes non-traditional projects with electronics, installations, video and dance collaborations.
  • The Spectator praises Piemontesi’s “…stunning technique with an intellectual capacity that few can match.”

Accessibility at Orchestra Hall

Assisted listening devices available Large print program available Wheelchair seating availableService dogs welcomePlease refrain from using strong perfumes and colognes

Complete event details

About This Concert

Masterpieces by two Russian powerhouses of 20th-century music, along with an Azerbaijani pioneer, comprise a stunning and far-reaching program featuring acclaimed German violinist Christian Tetzlaff and electric Ukrainian conductor Kirill Karabits.

Program

ALI-ZADEH
Fairy Tales / 14 min

SHOSTAKOVICH
Violin Concerto No. 2 / 29 min

INTERMISSION / 20 min

PROKOFIEV
Symphony No. 5 / 46 min

Artists

  • Minnesota Orchestra
  • Kirill Karabits, conductor
  • Christian Tetzlaff, violin

Fun Facts

  • Tetzlaff is known for his cerebral yet spiritual style, which focuses on fully inhabiting the music and honoring the composer’s original intentions.
  • In addition to his rising fame as a conductor, Karabits has made great contributions to musical research and restoration, including work on the transcription of Carl Philipp Emanuel Bach's Johannes Passion (thought to have ben permanently lost) and the discovery, premiere and recording of Telemann's previously unknown opera, Pastorelle en Musique.
  • Franghiz Ali-Zadeh is a composer and pianist known for works exploring the musical tradition of Azerbaijani mugham and 20th-century Western composition techniques. Her works have been performed by Yo-Yo Ma and the Kronos Quartet.

Accessibility at Orchestra Hall

Assisted listening devices available Large print program available Wheelchair seating availableService dogs welcomePlease refrain from using strong perfumes and colognes

Complete event details

About This Concert

Stormy, stylized, exquisite. The Russian Century is a guided tour through 120 years of Russian music and history, from Shostakovich and Stalin to Glasnost, the end of the USSR, and the composers charting Russia's cultural path today. Explore the genius of 20th- and 21st-century Russian composers with host Sam Bergman and conductor Sarah Hicks.

Program

MUSSORGSKY/Ravel
Baba-Yaga - The Hut on Fowl's Legs and The Great Gate of Kiev, from Pictures at an Exhibition / 6 min

KABALEVSKY
Overture to Colas Breugnon / 5 min

GLIÈRE
Introduction, from The Zaporozhy Cossacks / 3 min

USTVOLSKAYA
Symphonic Poem No. 2 / 12 min

SHOSTAKOVICH
Allegro, from Symphony No. 10 / 5 min

—INTERMISSION 20 MINUTES—

SHOSTAKOVICH
Prelude and Scherzo, from Two Pieces for String Octet / 11 min

PROKOFIEV
Allegro giocoso, from Symphony No. 5 / 10 min

GUBAIDULINA
Movement VI from Stimmen... verstummen... (Voices... Silence) / 5 min

AUERBACH
Icarus / 12 min

NAZAYKINSKAYA
My Soul Craves for the Sky / 4 min

Artists

Fun Facts

  • Led by Principal Conductor Sarah Hicks and hosted by Orchestra violist Sam Bergman, The Russian Century concert offers a musical and historical look at the cultural forces that influenced and sometimes battered these composers.
  • Americans often imagine that Russia went straight from the Soviet era to the troublesome meddler role it often plays on the international scene today. But in truth, the era following the collapse of the USSR was chaotic and culturally fragmented, and the music that grew from that chaos paints a picture of a country unlike any other on Earth.
  • This program offers an intimate perspective on featured composers and themes through lively discussion and wide-ranging musical selections.
  • Join us for a pre-concert happy hour, local craft brews and a chance to mingle with musicians onstage after the performance.

Accessibility at Orchestra Hall

Assisted listening devices available Large print program available Wheelchair seating availableService dogs welcomePlease refrain from using strong perfumes and colognes

Complete event details

About This Concert

Mozart’s Jupiter, his 41st and final symphony, builds to one of the most spectacular finales in all of classical music. It's inspired many composers who followed, including Robert Schumann, who compared it to the works of Shakespeare.
 
Symphony in 60 features classical music’s most beloved composers and “gotta-hear-it-live” masterworks. Our musicians have curated the list and can’t wait to share a few of those pieces with you this season.

Program

MOZART
Symphony No. 41, Jupiter / 37 min

Artists

  • Minnesota Orchestra
  • Michael Francis, conductor

Fun Facts

  • Jupiter is a true testament to Mozart’s genius and was written within weeks of Symphony No. 39 and Symphony No. 40 in 1778.
  • Mozart did not nickname his final symphony Jupiter—that was added later by a music promoter.
  • These bite-sized concerts are shorter and begin at 6pm. Join us for a pre-concert happy hour, local craft brews and a chance to mingle with musicians onstage after the performance.

Accessibility at Orchestra Hall

Assisted listening devices available Large print program available Wheelchair seating availableService dogs welcomePlease refrain from using strong perfumes and colognes

Complete event details

About This Concert:

Experience music from around the world and join us as we conclude our 2019-20 Chamber Music season with Prokofiev’s Bass Quintet. Everything from Mozart to Minnesota-based composer Reinaldo Moya is covered in this exquisite program.

MOZART
Duo in G major for Violin and Viola

MOYA
Violin 3.0

KODÁLY
Serenade for Two Violins and Viola

INTERMISSION / 20 min

SARASATE
Navarra

VILLA-LOBOS
The Jet Whistle

PROKOFIEV
Quintet in G minor

Fun Facts:

  • Mozart wrote two violin duos, this one in G major included, for his friend Michael Haydn (also the younger brother of Franz Joseph Haydn) to use as his own in order to fulfill a commission while he was ill and could not work.
  • Violin 3.0 was written for Reinaldo Moya’s wife Francesca Anderegg, who is a substitute violinist with the Minnesota Orchestra, to perform with two of her violin students at St. Olaf College.
  • Kodály’s biographer, László Eösze, developed a folk tale to go along with Kodály’s Serenade, assigning a variety of characters to each of the instruments—such as a lover, a mistress, and musicians serenading beneath a particular window.
  • Of Pablo de Sarasate's unmatched talents as a performer and composer, George Bernard Shaw remarked that “he left criticism gasping miles behind him.”
  • The title of The Jet Whistle was inspired by a technique used by flute players during fast glissandi, which reminded the composer of the sounds of a jet plane.
  • Prokofiev’s Quintet in G minor was commissioned by a traveling dance troupe whose musical ensemble only contained five members, which is what determined the piece’s unusual instrumentation.

Accessibility

Assisted listening devices available Large print program available Wheelchair seating availableService dogs welcomePlease refrain from using strong perfumes and colognes

Read more about Accessibility at Orchestra Hall.

Complete event details

All seating subject to availability and may vary by performance. Normal service charges apply. Available while supplies last and may not be combined with any other offer. Tickets are non-exchangeable and non-refundable.