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Student Groups

Student groups of 10 or more can purchase tickets for as little as $12 to select Minnesota Orchestra concerts—a savings of up to 80%! Student groups may reserve and purchase seats in advance with confirmed seat locations.

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Eligible Concerts

About This Concert

Strings take center stage as noted cellist and conductor Paul Watkins joins us for a luminous cello concerto, Britten’s idyllic musical portrait and Beethoven’s Fourth Symphony.

Program

BRITTEN
Variations on a Theme of Frank Bridge / 25 min

C.P.E. BACH
Cello Concerto in A major / 20 min

INTERMISSION / 20 min

BEETHOVEN
Symphony No. 4 / 32 min

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Program Notes PDF

Artists

Fun Facts

  • The Fourth Symphony represents a lighter, more relaxed version of Beethoven’s music, as it falls in between his bold Third (Eroica) and Fifth Symphonies. Robert Schumann described the Fourth as “a slender Greek maiden between two Nordic giants.”
  • Carl Philipp Emanuel Bach was Johann’s son and held a 30-year job as harpsichord accompanist to King Frederick the Great.
  • Britten’s Variations pay tribute to his teacher Frank Bridge, with each variation representing one facet of Bridge’s character.

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About This Concert

Strings take center stage as noted cellist and conductor Paul Watkins joins us for a luminous cello concerto and Beethoven’s Fourth Symphony. These bite-sized concerts are shorter and begin at 6pm. Join us for a pre-concert happy hour, local craft brews and a chance to mingle with musicians onstage after the performance.

Program

C.P.E. BACH
Cello Concerto in A major / 20 min

BEETHOVEN
Symphony No. 4 / 32 min

Read more

Program Notes PDF

Artists

Fun Facts

  • The Fourth Symphony represents a lighter, more relaxed version of Beethoven’s music, as it falls in between his bold Third (Eroica) and Fifth Symphonies. Robert Schumann described the Fourth as “a slender Greek maiden between two Nordic giants.”
  • Carl Philipp Emanuel Bach was Johann’s son and held a 30-year job as harpsichord accompanist to King Frederick the Great.

Accessibility at Orchestra Hall

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About This Concert:

Seven unique pieces, each highlighting a different family of instruments, come together in one program to showcase many of the individual voices that make up the Minnesota Orchestra.

GAUBERT
Médailles antiques

AL-ZAND
Canticle and Caprice

BEETHOVEN
Trio for Clarinet, Cello and Piano

JULIANI
Campane

INTERMISSION / 20 min

ÁLVAREZ
La Luna en los Andes

G. SMITH
Carrot Revolution

MOZART
Serenade for Winds in C minor

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Program Notes PDF

Fun Facts:

  • In addition to composing, Philippe Gaubert conducted the Paris Opera and taught at the Paris Conservatory.
  • The Minnesota Orchestra performed The Prisoner by Karim Al-Zand in July 2018 at an Inside the Classics Concert. Violinist Catherine Schubilske was so moved by the music in that performance that she sought out other pieces by the composer and found the string trio performed on this chamber concert.
  • Gabriella Smith’s bio shares that “When not composing, she can be found backpacking (playing trail songs on her ukulele along the way), birding, playing capoeira, and recording underwater soundscapes with her hydrophone.”
  • This performance of Steven Juliani’s Campane will be the world premiere, with the composer himself in attendance. In late 2018, the quintet of Minnesota Orchestra brass musicians who will premiere Campane made a studio recording of the work that is available on YouTube.

Accessibility

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About This Concert

Beethoven "heard" music with his mind after his ears gave out. Messiaen "saw" sounds in literal vibrant color. But the music of a listener plays an equal role in shaping the music we hear and the way we respond to it. In this concert, we explore the cutting edge of how the rhythms and melodies we love engage our brains and prod us to seek out more. 

Program

BEETHOVEN
Adagio molto e cantabile, from Symphony No. 9 / 15 min

MOZART
Allegro, from Symphony No. 39 / 6 min

SCHOENBERG
Excerpt from Accompaniment to a Cinematic Scene / 5 min

MESSIAEN
Serene hallelujahs of a soul that longs for heaven, from L’Ascension, Four Meditations for Orchestra / 6 min

BRUCKNER
Scherzo: Moving – Trio: Comfortable, from Symphony No. 4, Romantic / 9 min

—INTERMISSION 20 MINUTES—

SCHUMANN
Allegro molto vivace, from Symphony No. 2 / 8 min

REVUELTAS
Sensemaya / 7 min

LEVIN
Blur / 6 min

SIBELIUS
Finale: Allegro moderato, from Symphony No. 2 / 15 min

Artists

Fun Facts

  • Minnesota Orchestra Principal Conductor Sarah Hicks and violist Sam Bergman host this fascinating exploration of the way our minds engage with music on a neuropsychological level.
  • The mythologizing of composers and their mental health has a long history, but what of our own minds as we take in the work they created? What happens to our brains as we listen to music we love, or music we hate?
  • This program offers an intimate perspective on featured composers and themes through lively discussion and wide-ranging musical selections.
  • Join us for a pre-concert happy hour, local craft brews and a chance to mingle with musicians onstage after the performance.

Accessibility at Orchestra Hall

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About This Concert

The artistry of 20th-century legends Ella Fitzgerald and Frank Sinatra takes center stage for an evening celebrating the talent and tenacity of two great American singers.

Driven by passion, grit and captivating musical talent, Frank Sinatra and Ella Fitzgerald’s live collaborations revealed real warmth, wit and sophistication. Award-winning vocalists Tony DeSare and Capathia Jenkins beautifully recreate Frank and Ella’s friendship, onstage rapport and sparkling harmonies in a performance that truly shines.

Artists

  • Minnesota Orchestra
  • Sarah Hicks, conductor
  • Tony DeSare, piano and vocals
  • Capathia Jenkins, vocals

Fun Facts

  • Sinatra and Fitzgerald appeared together on stage and on television, but they never made an album together because of contractual obligations to their respective record labels.
  • Frank Sinatra is one of the best-selling artists ever and sold more than 150 million albums worldwide.
  • This performance includes favorites such as “Get Happy,” “They Can’t Take That Away from Me,” “Body and Soul,” “Sing, Sing, Sing” and many more.
  • Fitzgerald’s career took off in 1934, after she won Amateur Night honors at Harlem’s Apollo Theater.

Accessibility at Orchestra Hall

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About This Concert

In his Concerto for Orchestra, Bartók upends the concerto form by treating each section of instruments in a soloistic and virtuosic manner. The mood progresses from stern to spooky to life-affirming, with two witty scherzos scattered into the mix. Acclaimed American conductor Karina Canellakis leads the Orchestra in a vivacious performance that includes Bartók’s Concerto for Orchestra, Ravel’s jazz-infused Piano Concerto and Lineage by Zosha Di Castri.

Program

DI CASTRI
Lineage / 11 min

RAVEL
Piano Concerto in G major / 21 min

INTERMISSION / 20 min

BARTÓK
Concerto for Orchestra / 38 min

Artists

  • Minnesota Orchestra
  • Karina Canellakis, conductor
  • Francesco Piemontesi, piano

Fun Facts

  • Winner of the 2016 Georg Solti Conducting Award, Canellakis is the first female chief conductor of the Dutch Radio Philharmonic Orchestra.
  • Zosha Di Castri is a Canadian composer-pianist whose work includes non-traditional projects with electronics, installations, video and dance collaborations.
  • The Spectator praises Piemontesi’s “…stunning technique with an intellectual capacity that few can match.”

Accessibility at Orchestra Hall

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About This Concert

Norwegian genius takes the stage as Eivind Gullberg Jensen conducts Romantic masterpieces by Grieg and Rachmaninoff, a colorful trumpet concerto featuring Tine Thing Helseth, and a new work by Minnesota Orchestra Composer Institute alumnus Anna Clyne.

Program

CLYNE
This Midnight Hour / 12 min

GRIEG
Selections from Lyric Suite and Three Songs / 13 min

TOMASI
Trumpet Concerto / 15 min

INTERMISSION / 20 min

RACHMANINOFF
Symphony No. 2 / 60 min

Artists

  • Minnesota Orchestra
  • Eivind Gullberg Jensen, conductor
  • Tine Thing Helseth, trumpet

Fun Facts

  • After French composer Henri Tomasi wrote his Trumpet Concerto, it was originally deemed too difficult to perform. As more trumpet players took on the challenge, it became Tomasi’s best-known work, popular among soloists and audiences alike.
  • Edvard Greig had a “lucky frog” figurine that he kept with him during performances. The frog is on display in Greig’s former home and now-museum at Troldhaugen in Bergen, Norway.
  • Rachmaninoff’s First Symphony was panned by critics when it premiered in 1897. Stung by its failure, he composed the Second in secret in 1906-07.
  • Anna Clyne is one of four Minnesota Orchestra Composer Institute alumni to have earned a Grammy Award nomination for Best Classical Composition, in 2014 for her Prince Of Clouds.
  • Norwegian conductor Eivind Gullberg Jensen is comfortable conducting masterworks of classical music as well as opera, and was recently appointed the Artistic and General Director of Bergen National Opera for the 2020-2021 Season. 

Accessibility at Orchestra Hall

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About This Concert

Masterpieces by two Russian powerhouses of 20th-century music, along with an Azerbaijani pioneer, comprise a stunning and far-reaching program featuring acclaimed German violinist Christian Tetzlaff and electric Ukrainian conductor Kirill Karabits.

Program

ALI-ZADEH
Fairy Tales / 14 min

SHOSTAKOVICH
Violin Concerto No. 2 / 29 min

INTERMISSION / 20 min

PROKOFIEV
Symphony No. 5 / 46 min

Artists

  • Minnesota Orchestra
  • Kirill Karabits, conductor
  • Christian Tetzlaff, violin

Fun Facts

  • Tetzlaff is known for his cerebral yet spiritual style, which focuses on fully inhabiting the music and honoring the composer’s original intentions.
  • In addition to his rising fame as a conductor, Karabits has made great contributions to musical research and restoration, including work on the transcription of Carl Philipp Emanuel Bach's Johannes Passion (thought to have ben permanently lost) and the discovery, premiere and recording of Telemann's previously unknown opera, Pastorelle en Musique.
  • Franghiz Ali-Zadeh is a composer and pianist known for works exploring the musical tradition of Azerbaijani mugham and 20th-century Western composition techniques. Her works have been performed by Yo-Yo Ma and the Kronos Quartet.

Accessibility at Orchestra Hall

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About This Concert

Stormy, stylized, exquisite. The Russian Century is a guided tour through 120 years of Russian music and history, from Shostakovich and Stalin to Glasnost, the end of the USSR, and the composers charting Russia's cultural path today. Explore the genius of 20th- and 21st-century Russian composers with host Sam Bergman and conductor Sarah Hicks.

Program

MUSSORGSKY/Ravel
Baba-Yaga - The Hut on Fowl's Legs and The Great Gate of Kiev, from Pictures at an Exhibition / 6 min

KABALEVSKY
Overture to Colas Breugnon / 5 min

GLIÈRE
Introduction, from The Zaporozhy Cossacks / 3 min

USTVOLSKAYA
Symphonic Poem No. 2 / 12 min

SHOSTAKOVICH
Allegro, from Symphony No. 10 / 5 min

—INTERMISSION 20 MINUTES—

SHOSTAKOVICH
Prelude and Scherzo, from Two Pieces for String Octet / 11 min

PROKOFIEV
Allegro giocoso, from Symphony No. 5 / 10 min

GUBAIDULINA
Movement VI from Stimmen... verstummen... (Voices... Silence) / 5 min

AUERBACH
Icarus / 12 min

NAZAYKINSKAYA
My Soul Craves for the Sky / 4 min

Artists

Fun Facts

  • Led by Principal Conductor Sarah Hicks and hosted by Orchestra violist Sam Bergman, The Russian Century concert offers a musical and historical look at the cultural forces that influenced and sometimes battered these composers.
  • Americans often imagine that Russia went straight from the Soviet era to the troublesome meddler role it often plays on the international scene today. But in truth, the era following the collapse of the USSR was chaotic and culturally fragmented, and the music that grew from that chaos paints a picture of a country unlike any other on Earth.
  • This program offers an intimate perspective on featured composers and themes through lively discussion and wide-ranging musical selections.
  • Join us for a pre-concert happy hour, local craft brews and a chance to mingle with musicians onstage after the performance.

Accessibility at Orchestra Hall

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About This Concert

Russian pianist Kirill Gerstein brings rigor and wit to Rachmaninoff’s Second Concerto in a program that also features Shostakovich’s heroic Leningrad Symphony.

Program

RACHMANINOFF
Piano Concerto No. 2 / 36 min

INTERMISSION / 20 min

SHOSTAKOVICH
Symphony No. 7, Leningrad / 70 min

Artists

  • Minnesota Orchestra
  • Juanjo Mena, conductor
  • Kirill Gerstein, piano

Fun Facts

  • Gerstein will join the Orchestra throughout the calendar year 2020 to perform all of Rachmaninoff's major works for piano and orchestra.
  • In the early 2010s, Spanish conductor Juanjo Mena led a recording of Messiaen’s Turangalîla Symphony for Hyperion with the Bergen Philharmonic Orchestra, which has been described to “utterly redefine the terms under which past/current/future Turangalîlas need to be judged."
  • Shostakovich’s Leningrad Symphony premiered in its namesake city in 1942 while it was under siege by Nazi Germany. Loudspeakers broadcast the symphony throughout the city to erode German military morale.
  • The Boston Classical Review praises Gerstein, stating he has the “poetic sensitivity to match the technical fireworks.”

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About This Concert:

Sit back and enjoy a poignant, rhapsodic and wild musical ride through the music of Kodály, Brahms and more, in this program curated by Minnesota Orchestra musicians.

KODÁLY
Duo for Violin and Cello

MOZART
Divertimento in D major, K. 251

INTERMISSION / 20 min

BRITTEN
Divertimenti for String Quartet

STEINBERG
Subterranean Dance

BRAHMS
String Quartet No. 2

Fun Facts:

  • Susie Park and Silver Ainomäe are featured together again in Minnesota Orchestra performances of Brahms’ Double Concerto in May 2020.
  • Russell Steinberg wrote Subterranean Dance for an unusual ensemble which is sometimes referred to as a Pierrot Ensemble, based on the orchestration of Arnold Schoenberg’s Pierrot Lunaire. For additional character, Steinberg added a percussion part to his score.
  • Benjamin Britten decided he wasn’t pleased with the Divertimenti, but the music was later discovered and published, and has since become a favorite of many string musicians.
  • One musical motif in Brahms’ A-minor String Quartet is built around the notes F, A and E, quoting a motto of Brahms’ friend Joseph Joachim: “Frei aber einsam,” which means free but lonely. This phrase was a strong source of inspiration for the work.

Accessibility

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About This Concert

When asked if he's attempting to rewrite the rules on organ playing, Cameron Carpenter simply says, "Well no, because I'm not invested in the rules of organ playing." A true original, Carpenter is bringing his immense talent and revolutionary interpretations to the Northrop stage.

Please note: This concert will be performed at Northrop, University of Minnesota.

Program

NAZAYKINSKAYA
Winter Bells / 15 min

JONGEN
Symphonie concertante for Organ and Orchestra / 36 min

INTERMISSION / 20 min

PROKOFIEV
Cinderella Suite / 38 min

Artists

  • Minnesota Orchestra
  • Akiko Fujimoto, conductor
  • Cameron Carpenter, organ

Fun Facts

  • Organ phenom Cameron Carpenter returns to Minneapolis after thrilling audiences at his April 2018 performances with the Orchestra.
  • Akiko Fujimoto makes her subscription series debut with conducting this organ-centric celebration at Northrop.
  • Cinematically symphonic, Winter Bells by contemporary composer Polina Nazaykinskaya was inspired by a visit to the Volga region of Russia, her homeland.
  • The Minnesota Orchestra helped celebrate the return of the organ with a performance of John Harbison’s What Do We Make of Bach? for Orchestra and Obbligato Organ as well as Saint-Saëns’ Organ Symphony for an inaugural concert in October 2018.

Accessibility at Orchestra Hall

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About This Concert

Prepare to be stunned by the percussive journey of Aho’s concerto, then enchanted by the ornamental wonder of Rimsky-Korsakov’s universally-revered Scheherazade. Special guests for this concert are the Sphinx Virtuosi—one of the nation’s most dynamic professional chamber ensembles, comprising 18 top Black and Latinx classical soloists—who will open the concert with two South American showpieces and join the Orchestra for an unforgettable Scheherazade

Program

ROMERO
Fuga con Pajarillo, from Suite No. 1 for Strings / 7 min

PIAZZOLLA
Fuga y misterio / 6 min

AHO
Sieidi, Percussion Concerto / 36 min

INTERMISSION / 20 min

RIMSKY-KORSAKOV
Scheherazade / 47 min

Artists

  • Minnesota Orchestra
  • Osmo Vänskä, conductor
  • Martin Grubinger, percussion
  • Sphinx Virtuosi, chamber orchestra

Fun Facts

  • For Aho’s propulsive percussion concerto, the soloist moves from drums to marimba to vibraphone to tamtam.
  • The New York Times has praised soloist Martin Grubinger’s “monstrous fluency” and “ambidextrous talent.”
  • Rimsky-Korsakov’s masterpiece Scheherazade is an orchestral suite based on the Middle Eastern folk tale collection One Thousand and One Nights, or Arabian Nights.
  • The Sphinx Organization is a Detroit-based national organization dedicated to transforming lives through the power of diversity in the arts.
  • The Sphinx Virtuosi’s national tour this season includes performances at Carnegie Hall, Miami’s New World Center and St Paul’s Ordway Center.

Accessibility at Orchestra Hall

Assisted listening devices available Large print program available Wheelchair seating availableService dogs welcomePlease refrain from using strong perfumes and colognes

Complete event details

About This Concert

Prepare to be stunned by the percussive journey of Aho’s concerto, then enchanted by the ornamental wonder of Rimsky-Korsakov’s universally-revered Scheherazade. Special guests for this concert are the Sphinx Virtuosi—one of the nation’s most dynamic professional chamber ensembles, comprising 18 top Black and Latinx classical soloists—who will open the concert with two South American showpieces and join the Orchestra for an unforgettable Scheherazade.

Program

ROMERO
Fuga con Pajarillo, from Suite No. 1 for Strings / 7 min

PIAZZOLLA
Fuga y misterio / 6 min

AHO
Sieidi, Percussion Concerto / 36 min

INTERMISSION / 20 min

RIMSKY-KORSAKOV
Scheherazade / 47 min

Artists

  • Minnesota Orchestra
  • Osmo Vänskä, conductor
  • Martin Grubinger, percussion
  • Sphinx Virtuosi, chamber orchestra

Fun Facts

  • For Aho’s propulsive percussion concerto, the soloist moves from drums to marimba to vibraphone to tamtam.
  • The New York Times has praised soloist Martin Grubinger’s “monstrous fluency” and “ambidextrous talent.”
  • Rimsky-Korsakov’s masterpiece Scheherazade is an orchestral suite based on the Middle Eastern folk tale collection One Thousand and One Nights, or Arabian Nights.
  • The Sphinx Organization is a Detroit-based national organization dedicated to transforming lives through the power of diversity in the arts.
  • The Sphinx Virtuosi’s national tour this season includes performances at Carnegie Hall, Miami’s New World Center and St Paul’s Ordway Center.

Accessibility at Orchestra Hall

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About This Concert

Augustin Hadelich has dazzled Orchestra Hall audiences across several seasons with technical wizardry and heart-and-soul poetic playing. His concerts here are becoming the stuff of legend, so do not miss this! This concert is led by a fast-rising conductor, the Spaniard Pablo Heras-Casado, famous in European halls for his fiery podium style.

Program

WEBERN
Passacaglia / 11 min

BRITTEN
Violin Concerto / 32 min

INTERMISSION / 20 min

BRAHMS
Symphony No. 4 / 40 min

Artists

  • Minnesota Orchestra
  • Pablo Heras-Casado, conductor
  • Augustin Hadelich, violin

Fun Facts

  • Hadelich was named Musical America’s 2018 Instrumentalist of the Year and is often heralded for his phenomenal technique, soulful approach and insightful interpretations in solo appearances around the world.
  • Named Musical America’s 2014 Conductor of the Year, Heras-Casado has a varied and broad-ranging career, which includes appearances with both opera companies and symphony orchestras around the globe.
  • Hadelich, who will be playing his own cadenza for the Britten Violin Concerto at these performances, offers the following thoughts on the concerto: “Benjamin Britten was a passionate pacifist and poured his anguish about the suffering of the Spanish civil war (which raged from 1936 until 1939) into this piece. I think Britten’s concerto can be heard almost programmatically. The first movement is the idyllic Spain before the conflict, the second movement depicts the war and its cadenza the human pain and suffering. Then the moving and deeply personal third movement is about Britten himself trying to come to terms with what happened, with moments of mourning, moments of denial, and finally a glimmer of hope.”

Accessibility at Orchestra Hall

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About This Concert

Smooth and sonorous, Brahms’ concerto lyrically unites the voices of the cello and violin in a program that showcases two of the Orchestra’s virtuoso musicians.

Program

BRAHMS
Double Concerto for Violin, Cello and Orchestra / 31 min

INTERMISSION / 20 min

BRUCKNER
Symphony No. 9

Artists

Fun Facts

  • Brahms wrote this concerto inspired and encouraged by his friend and fellow collaborator, violinist Joseph Joachim.
  • Susie Park started playing the violin at age three and made her solo debut at five. Silver Ainomäe began cello at six and debuted in his first international competition at age eight.
  • Bruckner’s Ninth Symphony was his last. When he died, the symphony’s last movement was left unfinished.

Accessibility at Orchestra Hall

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About This Concert

Smooth and sonorous, Brahms’ concerto lyrically unites the voices of the cello and violin in a program that showcases two of the Orchestra’s virtuoso musicians.

Program

BRAHMS
Double Concerto for Violin, Cello and Orchestra / 31 min

INTERMISSION / 20 min

BRUCKNER
Symphony No. 9

Artists

Fun Facts

  • Brahms wrote this concerto inspired and encouraged by his friend and fellow collaborator, violinist Joseph Joachim.
  • Susie Park started playing the violin at age three and made her solo debut at five. Silver Ainomäe began cello at six and debuted in his first international competition at age eight.
  • Bruckner’s Ninth Symphony was his last. When he died, the symphony’s last movement was left unfinished.

Accessibility at Orchestra Hall

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About This Concert

Virtuosic both in technique and emotion, this performance features powerhouse pianist Kirill Gerstein’s Rachmaninoff homage and Stravinsky’s visceral and moving choral work.

Program

RACHMANINOFF
Three Russian Songs / 14 min
Piano Concerto No. 1 / 26 min

INTERMISSION / 20 min

RACHMANINOFF
Rhapsody on a Theme of Paganini / 23 min

STRAVINSKY
Symphony of Psalms / 22 min

Artists

Fun Facts

  • In 1929, Stravinsky composed Symphony of Psalms as a commission to celebrate the 50th anniversary of the Boston Symphony Orchestra.
  • The New York Times cites Gerstein’s background in jazz as influencing his ability to perform classically with both “uncanny delicacy” and “gnashing power.”
  • Rachmaninoff’s friend Stravinsky once characterized him as a “six-and-a-half-foot-scowl.”

Accessibility at Orchestra Hall

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About This Concert

Mozart’s Jupiter, his 41st and final symphony, builds to one of the most spectacular finales in all of classical music. It's inspired many composers who followed, including Robert Schumann, who compared it to the works of Shakespeare.
 
Symphony in 60 features classical music’s most beloved composers and “gotta-hear-it-live” masterworks. Our musicians have curated the list and can’t wait to share a few of those pieces with you this season.

Program

MOZART
Symphony No. 41, Jupiter / 37 min

Artists

  • Minnesota Orchestra
  • Michael Francis, conductor

Fun Facts

  • Jupiter is a true testament to Mozart’s genius and was written within weeks of Symphony No. 39 and Symphony No. 40 in 1778.
  • Mozart did not nickname his final symphony Jupiter—that was added later by a music promoter.
  • These bite-sized concerts are shorter and begin at 6pm. Join us for a pre-concert happy hour, local craft brews and a chance to mingle with musicians onstage after the performance.

Accessibility at Orchestra Hall

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About This Concert:

Experience music from around the world and join us as we conclude our 2019-20 Chamber Music season with Prokofiev’s Bass Quintet. Everything from Mozart to Minnesota-based composer Reinaldo Moya is covered in this exquisite program.

MOZART
Duo in G major for Violin and Viola

MOYA
Violin 3.0

KODÁLY
Serenade for Two Violins and Viola

INTERMISSION / 20 min

SARASATE
Navarra

VILLA-LOBOS
The Jet Whistle

PROKOFIEV
Quintet in G minor

Fun Facts:

  • Mozart wrote two violin duos, this one in G major included, for his friend Michael Haydn (also the younger brother of Franz Joseph Haydn) to use as his own in order to fulfill a commission while he was ill and could not work.
  • Violin 3.0 was written for Reinaldo Moya’s wife Francesca Anderegg, who is a substitute violinist with the Minnesota Orchestra, to perform with two of her violin students at St. Olaf College.
  • Kodály’s biographer, László Eösze, developed a folk tale to go along with Kodály’s Serenade, assigning a variety of characters to each of the instruments—such as a lover, a mistress, and musicians serenading beneath a particular window.
  • Of Pablo de Sarasate's unmatched talents as a performer and composer, George Bernard Shaw remarked that “he left criticism gasping miles behind him.”
  • The title of The Jet Whistle was inspired by a technique used by flute players during fast glissandi, which reminded the composer of the sounds of a jet plane.
  • Prokofiev’s Quintet in G minor was commissioned by a traveling dance troupe whose musical ensemble only contained five members, which is what determined the piece’s unusual instrumentation.

Accessibility

Assisted listening devices available Large print program available Wheelchair seating availableService dogs welcomePlease refrain from using strong perfumes and colognes

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About This Concert

Mozart’s only bassoon concerto highlights the instrument’s rich versatility in a concert that showcases the talent of the Minnesota Orchestra’s principal bassoonist, Fei Xie.

Program

FAGERLUND
Water Atlas / 18 min

MOZART
Bassoon Concerto / 18 min

INTERMISSION / 20 min

SAARIAHO
Ciel d’hiver / 10 min

ENESCU
Symphony No. 1 / 32 min

Artists

Fun Facts

  • Fei Xie began playing the bassoon at the age of twelve. Both of his parents are Peking Opera musicians and his uncle is a composer who introduced him to classical music at the age of three.
  • Originally created to reinforce an orchestra’s bass line, the bassoon has developed into an instrument with a distinctive, warm tone that allows it to create unique textures when paired with other instruments as well as sing out as a soloist.
  • In April 2018, the Orchestra’s Music Director Osmo Vänskä led the Netherlands Radio Philharmonic Orchestra in the world premiere of Water Atlas.
  • Finnish composer Kaija Saariaho received the 2017 BBVA Foundation Frontiers of Knowledge Award for her contributions in “breaking down the divisions between acoustic and electronic music.”

Accessibility at Orchestra Hall

Assisted listening devices available Large print program available Wheelchair seating availableService dogs welcomePlease refrain from using strong perfumes and colognes

Complete event details

About This Concert

Mozart’s only bassoon concerto highlights the instrument’s rich versatility in a concert that showcases the talent of the Minnesota Orchestra’s principal bassoonist, Fei Xie.

Program

FAGERLUND
Water Atlas / 18 min

MOZART
Bassoon Concerto / 18 min

INTERMISSION / 20 min

SAARIAHO
Ciel d’hiver / 10 min

ENESCU
Symphony No. 1 / 32 min

Artists

Fun Facts

  • Fei Xie began playing the bassoon at the age of twelve. Both of his parents are Peking Opera musicians and his uncle is a composer who introduced him to classical music at the age of three.
  • Originally created to reinforce an orchestra’s bass line, the bassoon has developed into an instrument with a distinctive, warm tone that allows it to create unique textures when paired with other instruments as well as sing out as a soloist.
  • In April 2018, the Orchestra’s Music Director Osmo Vänskä led the Netherlands Radio Philharmonic Orchestra in the world premiere of Water Atlas.
  • Finnish composer Kaija Saariaho received the 2017 BBVA Foundation Frontiers of Knowledge Award for her contributions in “breaking down the divisions between acoustic and electronic music.”

Accessibility at Orchestra Hall

Assisted listening devices available Large print program available Wheelchair seating availableService dogs welcomePlease refrain from using strong perfumes and colognes

Complete event details