Durban | Aug 12

Durban | Aug 12

The Orchestra landed in Durban on Saturday night, immediately feeling the more temperate weather of this busy port city known for expansive Indian Ocean beaches and a subtropical climate in the “garden province” of KwaZulu-Natal. A cheerful band of Orchestra wind players headed out first thing on Sunday morning to join the young musicians of the KwaZulu-Natal Youth Wind Band in rehearsal.

The youth ensemble is led by conductor Russell Scott, who explained that the band is made-up of cream-of-the-crop wind musicians from the across the KZN province, with many students traveling long distances to attend the weekly Saturday rehearsals. “We push for high standards,” he said. “We are proud to break barriers and make music together.”

Scott led the band in the “Jupiter” movement from Holst’s The Planets, as well as an African piece called Patta, Patta (“Touch, Touch”) that he arranged for wind ensemble. Following a performance by a Minnesota Orchestra wind ensemble, professionals and students broke into small sectionals to get to the nitty-gritty of their instruments and parts.

Associate Principal Percussion Kevin Watkins met with student percussionists to discuss the art of timpani playing. “It’s good to practice singing the notes to learn the pitches,” he said. “If you get your ear really close to the timpani, you can hear the pitch perfectly.” 

In a separate practice room, tuba player Jason Tanksley—the Minnesota Orchestra’s Rosemary and David Good Fellow—met with six young tuba and euphonium players to drill into The Planets. “You don’t have to play it too loudly,” he said. “Try it pianissimo.” 

Upstairs, bass trombone player Andrew Chappell was offering a masterclass on breathing. “Try to hear and feel how the breath relates to the sound,” he advised. “The better the breath, the better the sound. And eventually, forget about the breathing and just think ‘I am taking in my sound and letting out my sound.’”

Trombone students started to hit their stride. “I love the satisfaction in that passage,” one said.

“Yes!” Chappell affirmed. “You should feel that you made your statement.”

The KZN Wind Ensemble students will have a chance to hear the Orchestra make its statement at Sunday afternoon’s concert at Durban’s stately City Hall.

“Let it fly, so it is a little more colorful. I think it is more important to hear the entrances than the exits.” — Principal Clarinet Gabriel Compos Zamora


On Sunday afternoon, the Orchestra headed to Durban City Hall for a quick touch-up rehearsal and early evening concert. A quintessential example of Edwardian Neo-baroque architecture, Durban City Hall was completed in 1910 and was considered very bold in its design at the time. As the buses pulled up to the venue, many musicians stopped to take notice of the gorgeous exterior of the building.



Upon entering City Hall, musicians dodged wardrobe cases on stage, backstage—and even out in the house. With very little space in the backstage area, double bass and cello cases stood at the back of the stage and percussion cases just down the steps from stage left.

Tarps were hung in the hallway around the corner from backstage to create a men’s dressing area. Accessing backstage required going on to the stage—which proved to be somewhat challenging as orchestra staffers transported cases of water bottles backstage when the touch-up rehearsal began.

The concert began a special performance from the Clermont Choir, conducted by Brian Msizi Mnyandu. Orchestra members looked on, standing at the back and sides of the house. An outgrowth of the Clermont Catholic Church Choir, Clermont Choir was founded in 1992 and specializes in many different genres of music with a focus on choral, classical and African indigenous music. Based in Durban, the group has 60 members, most of whom reside in the metropolitan area. The choir performed a captivating short three-song set that had the audience clapping and cheering along.



Neeta Helms, president of Classical Movements, then welcomed the crowd and introduced Sherry Zalika Sykes, U.S. Consul General in Durban. Sykes shared that one of the highlights of her job is to welcome American visitors to South Africa and to build bridges between our two countries. She added that the Minnesota Orchestra musicians are some of America’s best diplomats, sharing their music and touching the lives of so many South Africans.

Music Director Osmo Vänskä then came to the stage, leading the Orchestra in both the South African and American national anthems. Sibelius’ En Saga opened the program, followed by Bongani Ndodana-Breen’s Harmonia Ubuntu, featuring Goitsemang Lehoybe.



At intermission, the smell of samosas wafted through the hallway and the crowd made its way to the refreshment area outside of the auditorium. During the break, an Orchestra staffer spoke with a group of students from Inanda Seminary, one of South Africa’s oldest schools for girls. Founded in 1853, the school is based in Inanda, a township about 15 miles northwest of Durban. Twenty-four students from the school were able to attend the concert, thanks to the Medtronic Foundation. Students Philasande and Zamakhosi shared their excitement about the event—that this was the first orchestra concert they and their classmates had ever attended. Zamakhosi, a choir student, spoke about Goitsemang Lehoybe’s performance. “Her singing was beautiful,” she said. “Hearing that kind of singing was new to me—I’ve never heard someone sing like that!”

Minnesota Orchestra brings its music, outreach to Durban, South Africa

— Photos and audio from Euan Kerr, Minnesota Public Radio

Although more restrained than the Cape Town audience, the crowd of nearly 1,000 came to life in the second half, with many cries of  “Bravo” at the end of Bernstein’s Overture to Candide. A young girl gasped loudly and squealed “Yes!” when the iconic opening notes of Beethoven’s Fifth Symphony filled the cavernous space. The audience leaped to their feet at the end of the piece, giving the ensemble a standing ovation.



For the encore, the Orchestra once again performed “Shosholoza.” As was the case in Cape Town, the crowd didn’t recognize it at first. Once the musicians started singing, the crowd, including the students from Inanda Seminary, went crazy, singing along and dancing in the aisles.

Post-concert, as the crew began to prep for the load-out, the girls sang their own version of "Shosholoza" at the front of the stage, with many musicians filming the performance with their phone.


Concert photography by Travis Anderson. Follow along throughout the tour on our South Africa landing page.

Minnesota Orchestra Staff